Mysterious Radio

Truth is available only to those who have the courage to question whatever they have been taught.

The Earth's Energetic Shift

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Energy can be transferred from person to person and from a person to a place. Have you ever walked into a building or been to a place that caused you to feel a certain way. This power transfer can be positive or negative, like when you walk into someone's  house for the first time and instantly feel at home, or when you visit a new location and instantly want to leave but are unsure as to why.

Occasionally (and unfortunately), the energy balance of places can be thrown off when something happens to it, or when people exploit it for financial gain. These are referred to as "hot spots" and include places such as Manchu Picchu and Sedona, Arizona. Before these places were valued for their natural beauty, but now are loved for their actual value. People often exploit the visitors at these natural attractions with over-priced gifts and tours. Find out more about this phenomenon on this week's podcast.

 

by Michelle Adshead, a digital marketing expert

Find her at www.marketingmixbymichelle.com and on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.

Lizzie Borden Took an Axe

Lizzie Borden took an ax, gave her mother 40 wacks. When she saw what she had done, she gave her father 41.

Photo Credit: Crime Archives 

Photo Credit: Crime Archives 

This dark children's rhyme doesn't quite tell the full story about one of America's most notorious murders. The victims (her father and stepmom) were violently stuck repeatedly hit with a hatchet but the total amount of strikes was 10 to 18 and technically this double murder is still unsolved. Although, much like today's OJ Simpson case, it is widely believed that Lizzie Borden was the murderer.

The case against Lizzie was built on the fact that she was seen after the murderers burning a dress which she claimed had paint on it. Back then, old clothing was passed on to the help or used for rags as materials were expensive and hard to come by. In addition, Lizzie apparently had a rough relationship with her stepmom and allegedly was forced to remain in the house. She was apparently cruel to animals and there was very little blood found on scene and none found on Lizzie herself. Is it possible that the maid, Bridget Sullivan, aided Lizzie in the cleanup? Not to mention, the murder weapon was never found.  There was the top of a hacket that was found in the basement but it was dusty and it is unclear if that was the top of the murder weapon or simply a broken tool.

It is speculated that Lizzie's father sexually abused her and that was the reason behind the murders. This is because his wounds (violently struck in the face) can be telling sign of abuse and the fact that she wore his High School graduation ring on her pinky has lead people to believe this was an abusive and incestual relationship. It is thought that Lizzie killed her father because of the abuse and her stepmother because she knew of the abuse yet did nothing to stop it, although there is very little evidence to this.

Andrew Borden, murdered. Photo Credit Crime Archives

Andrew Borden, murdered. Photo Credit Crime Archives

There are several things which made this case unique. Although Lizzie burned the dress she was allegedly wearing during the murderers, it was done days after the murders and yet police did not find it during their investigation so where was it hidden? There were also strange men visiting the week prior to the murders. If Lizzie was not the murderer, could those men have been involved, perhaps over a business deal gone wrong? The Borden's were a wealthy family so criminals could've had a target on their backs.

Find out more information about the notorious Lizzie Borden case on this week's podcast. Join us as K-town develops into this topic with Rebecca Pittman, author of The History & Haunting of Lizzie Borden which uncovers her secrets from that fateful August day.

 

by Michelle Adshead, a digital marketing expert

Find her at www.marketingmixbymichelle.com and on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.


True Crime: Thunder Over the Prairie

The Wild West was just that: Wild. It had a culture of violence, disease, and outlaws. Although it has been speculated that the Wild West wasn't as crazy as modern movies today have made it seem, adults living in the Wild West had 1 in 61 chance of getting murdered. 

dora hand

One notable murder during this time was that of Dora Hand. Dora lived in Dodge City and was a good girl by day, and a bad girl by might. One biographer described her as the following:

Saint or sinner, Dora Hand was the most graciously beautiful woman to reach the camp in the heyday of its iniquity. By night she was the Queen of the Fairy Belles, as old Dodge City termed its dance-hall women, entertaining drunken cowhands after all the fashions that her calling demanded. By day, she was the Lady Bountiful of prairie settlement, a demurely clad, generous woman to whom no appeal would go unheeded.

No matter how you look at it, Dora was a captivating woman whose allure had caused up to twelve deaths among men vying for her attention. Ironically this is what led to her own demise. Two men were fighting for her attention, they were James Kelley and James Kenedy. Kenedy rode up to Kelley's house in the dead of night and shot through his window before riding off. His "drive by" shooting was a successful murder, but not of the right person since his intended victim (Kelley) was not home. His bullets had soared past Kelley's bed and through a partition to where his beloved Dora was sleeping.

dora hand

Image the chaos that ensured between the two men after that! In Chris Enss' Book Thunder Over the Prairie, she talk about this insane real life murder. Find out more on this week's podcast and comment below! What you do you about this murder?

 

by Michelle Ashead is a digital marketing expert

Find her at www.marketingmixbymichelle.com and on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook.